Creating deployment packages with Zend Studio 9

Deploying your work in Zend Studio is quite easy.  You have the ability to deploy directly from your IDE, which is, in general, more for local environments, the Zend Developer Cloud or testing.  The reason for this is because generally the developer should not have access to production.  Therefore, the drag and drop deployment that Zend Studio supports is usually not going to be used, though in smaller development shops it may still be quite useful. The deployment mechanism in Zend Server uses a ZPK file, which contains the source

Enter Deployment: Zend Server 5.5

Today Zend Server 5.5 was released.  This is actually a pretty good sized deal.  The big addition to the Zend Server feature list is deployment.  Now, you might be saying “come on, Kevin, there are many PHP deployment solutions already”.  To which I would say “yes, there are.  But there are NO solutions that work out of the box“.  Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the box.  If you have Zend Server 5.5, you have deployment. So what I’m going to do with this post is give you a quick run-through

Deployment beta for Zend Server 5.5 – Getting Started

Deployment for PHP applications is one of those things where it’s tough to get a general reading on where things are.  On one hand you have people who have deployment mechanisms that seemingly automate the rotation of the earth and on the other hand you have people who jump up and down on their code trying to force it into a small hole (visions of Wile E. Coyote come to mind).  Others set up complex build procedures that has more processing on it than Cheez-Whiz (now I’m hungry for a grilled

PHP Deployment: RPM/yum, whatever your OS uses

This is an article that is based off of a talk I did covering various deployment mechanisms. The slides can be found at Slideshare.

Options for deploying PHP applications

View more presentations from Kevin Schroeder.

Our final examination is going to be my prefered method, which, ironically, I don’t actually use… yet. That is, the operating system specific method. Because I’m using CentoOS that means using RPM and yum for me. I don’t always deploy my applications, but when I do, I prefer yum. OK, that sounded funnier in my head.

PHP Deployment: Source Control

This is an article that is based off of a talk I did covering various deployment mechanisms. The slides can be found at Slideshare.

Options for deploying PHP applications

View more presentations from Kevin Schroeder.

The next deployment option that we’re going to look at is source control. You’re using source control, yes? There are arguments as to which is the best. Git seems to be winning that war in the open source world, but what it comes down to is that the source control you use is less important than whether or not you’re using source control.

PHP Deployment: PEAR

This is an article that is based off of a talk I did covering various deployment mechanisms. The slides can be found at Slideshare.

Options for deploying PHP applications

View more presentations from Kevin Schroeder.

Before I get into this one I would like to note that while I have presented several options (and will presenting one more after this) that none of these are given with the assumption that they are the only way or even the best way to do things. Each of these options is provided as a starting point. What that means is that you need to try it yourself and modify what I present here to fit what you need.

PHP Deployment: rsync

This is an article that is based off of a talk I did covering various deployment mechanisms. The slides can be found at Slideshare.

Options for deploying PHP applications

View more presentations from Kevin Schroeder.

The first one that we’re going to look at is rsync. What rsync does is maintain synchronization between an individual machine and another master machine. Updates are made by checking the differences between the files on the local machine and the files on the remote server and copying the changes over. It’s relatively easy to use.

PHP Deployment: Application considerations and process

It’s been a while since I’ve posted anything of any real significance. Part of that is because I have been working pretty hard on a webinar for Zend regarding deployment. Deployment is no small subject and testing your deployment options is no small undertaking. Then add other responsibilities and you end hav…. blah blah blah.

So, I have a lot to write about and with some of the things coming up I don’t know how much of what I want to write will be written. But let’s start with the basics. If you want to see the slides from the webinar here they are for your enjoyment.

Setting up a maintenance page with Zend Framework

One of the things that smaller sites who don’t have a fully redundant setup or a relatively minimal deployment mechanism need to do when doing some kind of maintenance is put up an “Under Maintenance” page. That or there was some massive problem and you need to just shut down access to the site while you fix the problem. With that in mind I have written a very simple example that allows you to create a maintenance page that is configurable and requires no changes to your existing site. This example uses Zend_Application, but all of the code can be used in a pure Zend_Controller application by adding the plugin however you normally add plugins.