Single User OAuth using Zend Framework’s Twitter Service Class

Michelangelo van Dam wrote a neat little article to help with single user Twitter access.  What that means is that you can set up a Twitter application and then start tweeting without having to use a username and password.  Michelangelo did it in the context of a Zend Framework MVC application and so this blog post is only about doing what he did using the Twitter service as a library instead of the whole kit ‘n kiboodle.  Basically, here’s your code. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Phonegap and Bootstrap not lovers?

Just a quick post.  I’ve been doing some work with Phonegap over the past week, really liking where I was going.  One of the reasons was because I was using the Twitter Bootstrap components which was making my stuff look not horrible.  Most of the pages were doing OK.  While their were definitely slower than native (I have a fairly old Android phone) the performance was quite liveable… … except for one page. I was mocking it up and it was doing fine on my desktop (duh!).  But then I

Sharing feedback with Twitter using Bit.ly – Part 2

In our previous installment we looked at setting our backend up so it could automatically retrieve the bit.ly URL for a given URL and store it as part of the data for a given instance of a Content model. What we’re going to do this time is take a look at the front end components.

Sometimes I find that doing things backwards can actually make things a little more clear. That way you can see the end result and then, as you work backwards, see how all the pieces work together.

Sharing feedback with Twitter using Bit.ly – Part 1

Over here there is a good article on sharing page feedback on Twitter. I’ll end up doing something similar but in a different manner. A little while I posted an article (Do you queue?) on how you could use the Zend Server Job Queue to run individual tasks. Well you can do the same thing here. I’ve made a few changes since that article, namely that Zend_Application is passed in both to execute() and to run() so I could easily retrieve application settings. Don’t know why I didn’t think of that earlier. Oh well.

A really quick, no API, Zend_Service_Twitter example

One of the cool things in Zend Framework is the Zend_Service layer. What it basically does is provide access to a variety of different service-based… well, services, so that you can easily integrate your application with other services. One example is, of course, Twitter. Often, to connect to various services you need to have an API key that you use to connect. The same is true for Twitter, except for public feed information. What this means is that you can search Twitter for free, with no API, easily.