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PHP 5.3 Certification Beta Testers Needed

Zend has recently teamed up with several of the top people in the PHP community to offer the PHP 5.3 Certification. It will be coming out in a few months, but before we can do that we need beta testers. That means YOU! If you want to participate all you need to do is fill out a quick qualification survey. Everyone who takes the survey can take the final certification at a discounted rate! Even if you aren’t chosen for the beta! These are the questions you will be asked (fill them out on the link, not on this page).

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Zend Server is proprietary. NNNOOOOO!!!!

In my Do You Queue article there was a comment posted about open source alternatives to Zend Server’s Job Queue. Being somewhat of an open source afficionado (I can spell that thanks to my love of fine tobacco products) that is a position that I can relate to. I have heard several times “I like what Zend Server offers but I only want to use open software, or I don’t think the features are worth the money.” I understand why. “Open” is the new black, and has been for a while now. So let’s explore these two issues. 1) Proprietary software, and 2) the price of the software.

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Zend Server Cluster Manager

On June 23rd Zend announced the release of Zend Server Cluster Manager. Which means what, exactly.

PHP is designed using a shared-nothing architecture. What that means is that nothing is shared. What that really means is that each individual PHP request is isolated from every other PHP request. That’s great! It makes for a very stable, very easy to use architecture. But what happens when you go beyond one server?

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Google Analytics feed handling

So there I was, looking at some other websites out there (because I think my site design sucks. Thanks, me). One of the things that virtually no blogs do is promote specific content. In other words, highlight content that is most popular over a certain time frame. So I was thinking to myself, how would I do that? One option would be to have a database table that could record each click. That, however, is boring and requires changes to my DB schema (evil!). What I want to do is take my most popular pages of the last week and highlight them at the top of the web site.

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PHP Deployment: RPM/yum, whatever your OS uses

This is an article that is based off of a talk I did covering various deployment mechanisms. The slides can be found at Slideshare.

Options for deploying PHP applications

View more presentations from Kevin Schroeder.

Our final examination is going to be my prefered method, which, ironically, I don’t actually use… yet. That is, the operating system specific method. Because I’m using CentoOS that means using RPM and yum for me. I don’t always deploy my applications, but when I do, I prefer yum. OK, that sounded funnier in my head.

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PHP Deployment: PEAR

This is an article that is based off of a talk I did covering various deployment mechanisms. The slides can be found at Slideshare.

Options for deploying PHP applications

View more presentations from Kevin Schroeder.

Before I get into this one I would like to note that while I have presented several options (and will presenting one more after this) that none of these are given with the assumption that they are the only way or even the best way to do things. Each of these options is provided as a starting point. What that means is that you need to try it yourself and modify what I present here to fit what you need.

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PHP Deployment: Source Control

This is an article that is based off of a talk I did covering various deployment mechanisms. The slides can be found at Slideshare.

Options for deploying PHP applications

View more presentations from Kevin Schroeder.

The next deployment option that we’re going to look at is source control. You’re using source control, yes? There are arguments as to which is the best. Git seems to be winning that war in the open source world, but what it comes down to is that the source control you use is less important than whether or not you’re using source control.

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PHP Deployment: rsync

This is an article that is based off of a talk I did covering various deployment mechanisms. The slides can be found at Slideshare.

Options for deploying PHP applications

View more presentations from Kevin Schroeder.

The first one that we’re going to look at is rsync. What rsync does is maintain synchronization between an individual machine and another master machine. Updates are made by checking the differences between the files on the local machine and the files on the remote server and copying the changes over. It’s relatively easy to use.

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PHP Deployment: Application considerations and process

It’s been a while since I’ve posted anything of any real significance. Part of that is because I have been working pretty hard on a webinar for Zend regarding deployment. Deployment is no small subject and testing your deployment options is no small undertaking. Then add other responsibilities and you end hav…. blah blah blah.

So, I have a lot to write about and with some of the things coming up I don’t know how much of what I want to write will be written. But let’s start with the basics. If you want to see the slides from the webinar here they are for your enjoyment.

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Why I don’t think type-hinted foreach loops are a good idea

There was a Twitter poll going around this morning that I thought was kind of interesting and got me thinking. It asked whether or not type-hinting in a foreach loop would be a good idea. The argument was that the same arguments that go for have type hinting in functions/methods apply to loops. Those reasons would primarily be structure. Having a more rigid structure means that the likelihood of a runtime error is lessened to a much greater degree. I agree with this statement, but I don’t think that it applies to loops. And here’s why.